Bustle in the Hedgerow

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Bustle in the Hedgerow
Monster ID 366
Locations Great Trip
Hit Points 150
Attack 145
Defense 130
No-Hit 155
Initiative 60
Meat None
Phylum weird
Elements None
Resistance None
Monster Parts bustle, hedgerow
Drops
green-frosted astral cupcake
Manuel Entry
refreshedit data
Bustle in the Hedgerow You're fighting a Bustle in the Hedgerow

As you pass by a hedgerow, high on the astral plane, you hear a rustling, bustling sound. Out from the hedgerow leaps a bustle! Why it's in the hedgerow, rather than under some Victorian-era dress, you're not sure. But don't be alarmed, now -- it only wants to beat you senseless.

Hit Message(s):

It busily bustles you in the <ear>. Springy! Ow! Argh! Oof!

It pounds you with its springy parts, and springs over you with its poundy parts. Eek! Oof! Ow!

Critical Hit Message:

It savagely thrashes you, and the forest echoes with laughter for a while. Ugh! Ugh! Ouch!

Miss Message(s):

It tries to bustle you in the <giblets>, but you hustle away.

It springs at you, but you spring away just as quickly.

Fumble Message:

It tries to tell you that all that glitters is gold, but you're not buying it. (FUMBLE!)


After Combat

Cupcake.gifYou acquire an item: green-frosted astral cupcake (15.7% chance)*
You gain 36-37 <substat>.

Occurs during the Great Trip.

References

  • The name of the adventure and the description refer to the lyrics in the popular Led Zeppelin song, "Stairway to Heaven": "If there's a bustle in your hedgerow, don't be alarmed now / It's just a spring clean for the May Queen..."
  • The critical hit and fumble messages also refer to the lyrics in Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven": "There's a lady who's sure all that glitters is gold / And she's buying a stairway to heaven..." and "And a new day will dawn for those who stand long / And the forest will echo with laughter..."
  • A "bustle", aside from being a sense of noise and activity (like "hustle and bustle"), was actually a framework used to support the back of a woman's dress, popular in Victorian times.