A Sietch in Time/Old

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A Sietch in Time
A Sietch in Time

You tramp through the desert for a while, not finding anything that looks like a pyramid. However, you do see what looks like a collection of small buildings off in the distance, and start heading toward them.

Suddenly, in a whirl of sand, you find yourself surrounded by gnomes in tan cloaks and black jumpsuits. One of them steps forward. "Halt, interloper. This is our sietch, and trespassers are not welcome."

"Sorry guys," you say. "I'm not looking for trouble. I'm just looking for a pyramid." You show them your father's diary, by way of explanation.

"Hmm," says the gnome. "Yes, we know of this place. However, it is deep in the desert -- you will not reach it on foot. Even for our most experienced worm-riders, it is an arduous journey."

"Worm-riders?"

"Yes. Some of us have claimed the skill and honor of riding the giant sandworms that roam the desert sands."

"Any chance you could teach me?"

The gnome gives you a grave look, then confers with the other gnomes for a short time. "Very well, wetlander. I am Gnasir, gnaib of this tribe. We are willing to share our knowledge with you, but first you must prove yourself to our tribe. Near the lands of the Oasis, there is a stone rose. It was greatly adored, and was the symbol of our tribe until the shifting sands and other troubles forced us to relocate. Your first task will be to bring it to us."

You nod your agreement, and set out again.


Occurs at The Arid, Extra-Dry Desert (if you have the Ultrahydrated effect active)

Notes

References

  • Worm-riders are a reference from the Dune novels.
  • The rose may be a reference to the song Desert Rose by Sting, which was also inspired by the novel Dune. Especially as he is a British musician.
  • The encounter name is a reference to the phrase "A stitch in time saves nine."
  • A Sietch is what a Fremen settlement is called in the Dune novels.
  • The term "wetlander" may be a reference to the Wheel of Time series of fantasy novels, in which the desert-dwelling Aiel people refer to non-desert dwellers as "wetlanders."
  • The comment about the stone rose being greatly adored is a reference to the song "I Wanna Be Adored" by The Stone Roses.